Windows: configure VS Code integrated bash shell for Anaconda


So you’re / you’ve-been using Python in Windows. You know your way around setting up PATH variable so that you type “python” in your command prompt and it works. Now, say that you want to use Anaconda Python in bash. Let’s go one step further and say, you want to use the bash from your Visual Studio Code integrated shell. The process isn’t too different. There doesn’t seem to exist a guide, which covers all these together – hence this post.

My goal is to show you one of the possible ways to configure your development environment quickly – to you get you going in no time.

At the end you should have the following:

  • Bash shell working with python and,
  • Visual studio shell integration (optional)

Continue reading “Windows: configure VS Code integrated bash shell for Anaconda”

Virtual Box boot from USB


You may want to do this for a number of reasons, you may have a bootable USB thumb-drive / USB flash drive / USB stick (whatever you call it) containing Live CD, installation image etc. before you actually use it on your computer, or may be you don’t want to use that bootable USB on your computer, whatever that case might be.

Linux

Following are the 3 different methods you could use.

Method # 1: Create a pointer to your USB

I am using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, but it could be any Linux OS/distro/flavor. If you have a bootable USB that you want to boot your VM from, go ahead and insert it.

First you need to find the logical device for your removable USB flash drive. One way to do it is to use lshw command (ls for hardware, get it?) It is recommended that you run this command as a super-user (sudo) otherwise “your output may be incomplete or inaccurate, you should run this program as super-user” warning would be displayed, which makes sense. If you need more information on lshw, including installation and basic usage, see this project website or this article.

Here is the raw command which shots of how KDE used to look like back in the day, in openSUSE 11.1 – this was the first ever Linux distro which got me hooked with Linux. To put things in perspective, openSUSE’s current version is 15.0 😉 will output EVERYTHING:

# "sudo lshw" shows everything
$ sudo lshw -class volume -disable TEST -notime

And look for the entry associated with your hard drive’s label. Alternatively, following commands much more concise if you know what you are looking for:

$ sudo lshw -businfo -disable TEST | grep volume

In my case, from the first command above, it was /dev/sdb1.

Next, Continue reading “Virtual Box boot from USB”

Ubuntu: deploy .NET Core app


Today, I want to walk-through the steps I used to deploy ASP.NET Core website application to Ubuntu Server. ASP.NET Core supports several Linux distributions, I am using Ubuntu Server.

From a quick internet search I found 3 decent blog posts:

  1. decatechlabs.com article
  2. garywoodfine.com article
  3. blog.bobbyallen.me post

There already are many articles which talk about how to set up your development environment for .NET Core but this post starts, where they end. It’s about getting production ready.

These are to-the-point & well written. But, either these posts are more than a year old, or they are for setting up your development environment, not for production deployment. You need to install .NET Core run-time, not the .NET Core SDK (which also includes run-time). You can download it from:  Continue reading “Ubuntu: deploy .NET Core app”

Install OpenCV: ~10 min!


Disclaimers

  1. Tested on: Windows 7, Windows 10
  2. There could be other ways to get Open CV working on your Windows computer

Before installation

  1. Find you OS architecture
  2. Decide the Python version (e.g. 2.7 or 3.x)
  3. Install Anaconda, open terminal as administrator and , Continue reading “Install OpenCV: ~10 min!”