Restarting ALSA Audio


Follow these steps:

sudo /etc/init.d/alsa-utils stop
sudo alsa force-reload
sudo /etc/init.d/alsa-utils start

When I was running openSUSE  11.1 in previous decade, sometimes the ALSA sound diver throws an error while playing some video with VLC media player. The solution was, just to restart the ALSA sound driver by running the following command as super-user:

/etc/init.d/alsasound restart

Virtual Box boot from USB


You may want to do this for a number of reasons, you may have a bootable USB thumb-drive / USB flash drive / USB stick (whatever you call it) containing Live CD, installation image etc. before you actually use it on your computer, or may be you don’t want to use that bootable USB on your computer, whatever that case might be.

Linux

Following are the 3 different methods you could use.

Method # 1: Create a pointer to your USB

I am using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, but it could be any Linux OS/distro/flavor. If you have a bootable USB that you want to boot your VM from, go ahead and insert it.

First you need to find the logical device for your removable USB flash drive. One way to do it is to use lshw command (ls for hardware, get it?) It is recommended that you run this command as a super-user (sudo) otherwise “your output may be incomplete or inaccurate, you should run this program as super-user” warning would be displayed, which makes sense. If you need more information on lshw, including installation and basic usage, see this project website or this article.

Here is the raw command which shots of how KDE used to look like back in the day, in openSUSE 11.1 – this was the first ever Linux distro which got me hooked with Linux. To put things in perspective, openSUSE’s current version is 15.0 😉 will output EVERYTHING:

# "sudo lshw" shows everything
$ sudo lshw -class volume -disable TEST -notime

And look for the entry associated with your hard drive’s label. Alternatively, following commands much more concise if you know what you are looking for:

$ sudo lshw -businfo -disable TEST | grep volume

In my case, from the first command above, it was /dev/sdb1.

Next, Continue reading “Virtual Box boot from USB”

Ubuntu: deploy .NET Core app


Today, I want to walk-through the steps I used to deploy ASP.NET Core website application to Ubuntu Server. ASP.NET Core supports several Linux distributions, I am using Ubuntu Server.

From a quick internet search I found 3 decent blog posts:

  1. decatechlabs.com article
  2. garywoodfine.com article
  3. blog.bobbyallen.me post

There already are many articles which talk about how to set up your development environment for .NET Core but this post starts, where they end. It’s about getting production ready.

These are to-the-point & well written. But, either these posts are more than a year old, or they are for setting up your development environment, not for production deployment. You need to install .NET Core run-time, not the .NET Core SDK (which also includes run-time). You can download it from:  Continue reading “Ubuntu: deploy .NET Core app”

[1/4] Docker: Java, SpringBoot, MySQL & docker-compose


I created a video, for a web conference for my school. In this video I talk about how to perform initial groundwork to perform initial set-up. In the 2nd episode, I would talk more about the docker-compose v2, v 2.1 and v2.3.

 

Screen Recording: Ubuntu


I have used CamStudio in Windows, and I am happy with it but, there are times when we have to make the most of what is available.This time, I needed to record screen-cast in Ubuntu.

# add-apt-repository ppa:maarten-baert/simplescreenrecorder
# apt update
# apt install simplescreenrecorder

Despite of being simple, it has all essential features of CamStudio for Windows or QuickTime for macOS, and it recorded very good quality of audio and video! Making itself my new favorite screen recording application.

Earlier, I tried using VLC for screen capturing, because it helps me to avoid yet another software program on my computer on my computer and, VLC also lets me choose file formats to save my recording to.

Here are the steps:

Continue reading “Screen Recording: Ubuntu”

Red Hat Commercial


Stop Wasting CDs; Install Linux Straight from an ISO


GNU/Linux comes in many different flavours, apart from the fact that each individual distro has a new release almost every six months, if not less. I have a habit of trying out every new version the moment it comes out, and I’m sure many of you do too.

Now, let’s assume you have downloaded a new version of a distro and are in the mood to try it out right away. It’s past midnight and you realise that you’ve run out of blank CDs/DVDs. So you will have to wait till the morning when the shops open, to be able to burn the distro image in order to install it. I’m sure a lot of us often face this problem. In this article I’ll share a simple trick by which you can install the new distro without burning it to a CD/DVD. The only requirement is that you Continue reading “Stop Wasting CDs; Install Linux Straight from an ISO”

xPUD – Firefox powered Operating System [My Review]



While Google might have dashed to the front lines with its Chrome browser-based OS, it is Firefox which is more suitable as a base for an operating system: With its near unlimited extensibility thanks to add-ons, plugins and themes, you can make your Firefox supremely powerful and uniquely you. When one looks at the array of applications built on the same powerful framework as Firefox, one realizes how much more appropriate it is as the basis for a cloud operating system; compared to Google Chrome, that is. Continue reading “xPUD – Firefox powered Operating System [My Review]”